Coaching Students for Video Interviews

As the undoubtedly most impactful societal moment of the 21st Century thus far, the COVID-19 outbreak is having and will continue to have an indelible impact on most parts of American life for the immediate future. People will continue for many months to avoid direct contact with others for fear of contracting the virus and while the economy is showing signs of significant unemployment, some industries are hiring and even growing and the recent change from on campus courses to online courses is an excellent opportunity for faculty to coach students on video interviewing. Continue reading Coaching Students for Video Interviews

Grading in the Time of Covid-19

While I have previously taught online before, this semester has not been like any other I have experienced, or I am guessing, like any of us have experienced. Our generations have not experienced a world-wide pandemic before. Our students are struggling right now and so are we. However, we still want to help our students finish this insane semester. As an Assistant Professor of Business Communication, I have made some specific adaptations during this semester and have received positive feedback from my students regarding these changes. Continue reading Grading in the Time of Covid-19

Communicate and Connect: Improving Online Teaching during the Coronavirus Pandemic

Perhaps the only good thing about my experience of the Coronavirus pandemic of 2020 has been improving my online teaching. I teach Technical & Business Writing, First-year Composition, and Corequisite Developmental Writing courses. I have previously been successful with my online teaching because I communicate regularly with my students. Most importantly, I comment thoroughly on the rough drafts and the final drafts. I am a prompt responder to all emails. I also acknowledge the strengths of the discussion forum postings with “likes” and/or explicit comments on their postings. This emphasis on communication keeps students engaged and moving forward throughout the semester. Continue reading Communicate and Connect: Improving Online Teaching during the Coronavirus Pandemic

How Nonprofit Organizations Are Communicating Through the COVID-19 Disaster

The current COVID-19 pandemic represents something unimaginable a few months ago, except to disaster planners and infectious disease experts. Public discourse about the disaster has focused predominately on the for-profit and governmental sectors, hardly touching on how nonprofit organizations are coping with the fallout of the pandemic. Given the disparity, I sought to find out how public charities in my region are coping, including their communication efforts. The Greater Sacramento Area is a seven-county region in Northern California that includes both urban and rural populations. The region houses the state capital (in Sacramento). Because of its diversity, the region is a good bellwether for the nonprofit sector in the state, which is also at the leading edge of the nonprofit sector. Continue reading How Nonprofit Organizations Are Communicating Through the COVID-19 Disaster

What Happens to Global Virtual Teams When a Pandemic Hits? Maintaining Normalcy and Stability with Disruption All Around

Each year, the Virtual Business Professional (VBP) program brings together professors and students from across the globe to engage in client projects. The VBP program of 2020 occurred from the beginning of March through the middle of April. In this article, we share how the COVID-19 pandemic affected VBP participants and their teams. We present post-project survey results (completed by 440 of 530 participants for an 83 percent response rate), professor comments, and student comments to demonstrate how VBP participants overcame many of the pandemic disruptions to work effectively in virtual teams, develop compassion and empathy for one another, and foster more global mindsets. Continue reading What Happens to Global Virtual Teams When a Pandemic Hits? Maintaining Normalcy and Stability with Disruption All Around

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Reflections on Textbooks: Past and Future

Gerald J. Alred is Professor Emeritus of English at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where he is an adviser to the Professional Writing Program. He is the author of numerous scholarly articles and several standard bibliographies on business and technical communication. Professor Alred was recipient of the prestigious Jay R. Gould Award for “profound scholarly and textbook contributions to the teaching of business and technical writing” in 2004 and an Outstanding Teaching Award recipient from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 1991. He is a founding member of the editorial board of the Journal of Business and Technical Communication. He dedicates his time in managing the archival website InlandChorus.com® which he developed. He also works with Wright State University Special Collections and Archives to preserve the history of the Inland Children’s Chorus. Continue reading Reflections on Textbooks: Past and Future

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Autism

Katherine Breward is an Associate Professor at the University of Winnipeg. Her research is centered around labour market entry for historically disadvantaged populations, with a particular focus on best practices in disability accommodation. Her research has appeared in the Canadian Journal of Disability Studies, the Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, the Case Research Journal, and Equality, Diversity, and Inclusion: An International Journal. Dr. Breward is also a strong advocate of case-based teaching and an award winning case writer. Cases designed to allow for practice of applied skills and cases designed to increase empathy for “the other” feature strongly in her teaching, particularly in human resource management courses such as “Recruitment and Selection” and “Leadership and Fairness in Complex Organizations”. When not working Dr. Breward enjoys spending time on her 25 acre orchard with her family and a menagerie of pets and reading inclusive science fiction and fantasy. Continue reading Autism

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Incivility, Gender, and the Workplace: Not So Expected Findings from Three Studies

Last month, I interviewed Dr. Allison Gabriel who is an Associate Professor of Management and Organizations and Robbins Fellow in the Eller College of Management at the University of Arizona. She earned her Ph.D. in Industrial and Organizational Psychology in 2013 from the University of Akron. Her research focuses on emotions at work, employee recovery, interpersonal stressors and relationships at work, motivation, and employee well-being. Dr. Gabriel is currently working on research related to understanding women’s experiences transitioning back into the workforce post-partum, and daily experiences of sexism and sexual harassment in organizations. Continue reading Incivility, Gender, and the Workplace: Not So Expected Findings from Three Studies

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Changing Motivation Theories and the Role of Communication in their Introduction to the Workplace

Dr. Marianna Richardson is an adjunct professor in the Marriott School of Business at Brigham Young University. She teaches courses in management communication and psychology for both undergraduate and graduate students. She received her doctorate from Seattle Pacific University. Her research interests lie in the areas of business communication and motivation theory. She is also the current editor of the Marriott Student Review, a peer-reviewed journal for business students. Continue reading Changing Motivation Theories and the Role of Communication in their Introduction to the Workplace

Maximizing Communication Methods to Promote Student Development and Success

Mollie Hartup, MBA, is Instructor in the Honors College, Coordinator of Communications, and YSU Magazine editor at Youngstown State University. She is currently pursuing a PhD in Communication and Information with a focus on organizational communication at Kent State University. She has prior professional experience in television news and print journalism. Amy Cossentino, PhD, is Dean, Honors College, Youngstown State University. She has nearly 30 years of experience in higher education and currently also teaches in the Honors College and the Beeghly College of Education at YSU. Together, they have combined their interests and expertise in communication and education to develop a debriefing framework for schools and organizations to leverage shared experiences such as professional conferences. They are actively using and testing this framework in practice. Continue reading Maximizing Communication Methods to Promote Student Development and Success

Business and Marketing Communication in an Omni-Channel World

Eugene Sivadas is Professor of Marketing in the Milgard School of Business at the University of Washington, Tacoma. He is the co-author of the recently published textbook, Marketing Channel Strategy: An Omni-Channel Approach, which expounds on these themes while offering practical approaches to operationalize omni channel marketing environment. Sushil Oswal catches Eugene Sivadas for a brief Q&A on omni channel strategy’s’ relevance for Business and Marketing Communication professionals and instructors. Continue reading Business and Marketing Communication in an Omni-Channel World

Moving Students Away from Teacher-Centric Writing to Reader-Centric Business Communication

A research project I’m currently working on examines how new employees, mostly recent college grads, learn to write within an organization. One of my interview questions is, “Are you a different writer today than you were when you first joined the organization?” And the answer is usually, with few exceptions, yes. And many interviewees then tell a story about learning to write at their organization that goes something like this: when they first started, they would write e-mails comprised of long sentences–and even longer paragraphs–, multiple paragraphs of text without any guideposts for reading, and lots of general information targeted at no specific audience. They quickly realized, however, that their reader (a boss, a client) didn’t want all of that—instead, the reader wanted something short and to the point. Continue reading Moving Students Away from Teacher-Centric Writing to Reader-Centric Business Communication